Posted on Leave a comment

How do you get water out of a rock?

Zeolite

How do you get water out of a rock?  Easy – if that rock is a zeolite!

In 1756, Swedish scientist Axel Cronstedt discovered that heating stilbite (a natural zeolite species) to a high temperature caused the rock to steam, as if there was water inside it.  Cronstedt coined the term “zeolite”, a combination of the Greek words for “to boil” (zeo) and “stone” (lithos).  We now know that the structure of zeolite can ‘trap’ and hold water molecules.

Zeolites are composed of molecules of oxygen, aluminum, and silica that form interlinked tetrahedra.  These structures are like molecular cages, which can trap and hold other molecules such as water.

The zeolite cages retain the water and release it slowly, making zeolite a very useful addition to soils and growth media. Zeolite can also be pretreated with elemental nutrients such as potassium; the zeolite holds the potassium and releases it slowly into the soil, making it an effective slow release fertilizer.

The stable tetrahedra structure of zeolite provides the additional benefit of soil aeration.  Zeolite, unlike other mineral additives, does not break down over time.  Adding a soil amendment like Absorbent Products’ Green Patch™ increases the soil’s porosity and allows more oxygen to reach the plant root systems.

There are 40 naturally occurring zeolite species, and over 200 more that have been created artificially. Natural zeolites were formed thousands to millions of years ago, in areas where volcanic rock and ash reacted with alkaline groundwater.  Synthetic zeolites can be ‘custom-made’ so that their tetrahedra are specifically shaped to encapsulate the target material.  Due to this, synthetic zeolites are used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from petrochemical processing to nuclear radiation remediation.

One particular natural species of zeolite, called clinoptilolite, has a strong exchange affinity for ammonium.  This makes it an excellent odour absorber when used for cat litter and livestock bedding, as ammonia is trapped and held.  Absorbent Products’ line of zeolite treatments for animal waste management, such as Horse Sense™ and Poultry Sense™, are all made from our deposit of natural clinoptilolite located in the mountains of southern British Columbia.  For more information on the many uses of zeolite and our products, give us a call!

Posted on

Important Vegetable Gardening Tips for Beginners

Welcome to the world of gardening! If you’re new to this fun and rewarding activity, here are some important tips to help you out along the way!

A sunny area with level ground is the best place to plant a vegetable garden. Planting on level ground will make it much easier to prepare the soil, plant and irrigate your vegetables. In the case that planting on a level surface is not an option, be sure to run your rows across the slope, rather than up and down. This will help to keep the soil from washing away when watering your garden.

Avoid planting a garden under trees as well as on the north side of buildings, shrubs or other tall objects, as they will block the sunlight.

When planning the layout of your garden, place the tallest plants on the north side. This will prevent them from blocking shorter plants from receiving sunlight.

Be sure to leave enough space between the rows or beds so that you can easily move around to work and water the plants.

Try to keep your soil evenly moist while your vegetables are growing. To do so, apply water when you see that the top 1 – 2 inches (2.5 – 5 cm) of soil is dry.

Water only the base of your plants. Watering from above will waste water (through evaporation) and moisture on the foliage of your plants can potentially lead to leaf diseases.

Try to move your crops around (or plant different crops) after each season. Planting the same crop (or crops from the same family) in the same area two years in a row may encourage pests that feed on certain crops to inhabit the soil in these areas.

Image by mccun934

Posted on

Stall DRY in Compost

Stall DRY is used to control wetness, odor and ammonia in stalls, cages and other animal dwellings. It is an all natural product and is safe to use with nearly all animals.

When used with bedding and waste that is composted, Stall DRY is safe to be composted and used in the garden. In fact, as a natural product containing food grade diatomaceous earth, individuals have found that Stall DRY provides many benefits, resulting in a more compostable and drier product that is easier to spread in the garden. When contained in compost and added to the garden, Stall DRY can also help to aerate the soil and will act as a natural insecticide.

Mixed with water, Stall DRY has a pH of approximately 6 while pure water has a pH of 7 or 8. Therefore adding Stall DRY to your compost and garden will not affect the pH of the soil too drastically and will not harm your plants (unless they are highly sensitive to changes in pH).

Please note: any end-product meant for human consumption that has come in contact with Stall DRY should be washed well before being consumed. This is due to the fact that government regulations state that no food grade diatomaceous earth should be present in any end-product that is meant for human consumption.

Image by suavehouse113

Posted on

Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth: A New Construction Material?

While many people find food grade diatomaceous earth a very useful form of pest control to use around their homes and in their gardens, some individuals have become very creative in their attempt to protect their homes from insects. Recently, individuals have informed us that they have applied DE not only around the perimeter of their homes, basements and attics but that they have also sprinkled diatomaceous earth in the walls of their homes during construction, in an attempt to deter termites and other crawling insects! In fact, customers who applied food grade diatomaceous earth in the walls of their home over 8 years ago have seen great results and have never had a termite problem!

Individuals have found diatomaceous earth to be very effective as an insecticide. In a world where sustainability is key, individuals prefer to use this natural method of insect control in order to minimize their impact on the environment.

We love to learn about your creative uses for this amazing product and to hear about the results that you have seen! Please share your story using the form below!

Image by Martin Pettitt

Posted on

Growing a Safe and Natural Urban Garden

Many individuals are moving towards more sustainable living, with urban gardening becoming a very popular hobby.

While urban gardens are great for the environment and the health and well being of those who grow them, there can also be some risks to watch out for.

Studies have shown that gardens near heavy traffic areas may become contaminated with high levels of heavy metals. There are steps that you can take, however, to reduce the risk of your garden becoming contaminated, even if you are working in a contaminated area.

Learn about the land you are working with. Before planting a garden it is important that you try to identify whether or not your soil may be contaminated. Your local land authority and health or environmental agencies may be able to help with records of past uses as well as soil testing. If you discover your land may be contaminated, is near buildings where lead paint may have flaked off or is in a high traffic area, you may want to consider growing your crops in a raised bed. Line the bed with a sturdy liner and bring in new, clean soil in which to grow your crops. Barriers such as a wall, thick hedge or other thick vegetation can also be helpful in blocking the dust and contaminants that may threaten your crops from the presence of heavy traffic. If you are in an area with lots of traffic, creating a barrier around your urban garden is a great idea to help eliminate the risk of contamination.

These simple suggestions can be very helpful in ensuring the growth of a clean garden and supplying you and your family with fresh, natural, homegrown ingredients.

Image by qmnonic

Posted on

Jump Start Your Garden: How to Plant Seeds Indoors

Are you planning on planting a vegetable garden this year? If so, get a head start by planting your seeds indoors!

While not all plants are suited to this method, many vegetables are. Suitable vegetablesinclude broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, eggplant, leeks, onions, parsley, peppers, tomatoes and squash. Vegetables that do not do well when transplanted and therefore should not be planted indoors ahead of time include root crops such as carrots, beets, turnips, and parsnips as well as corn, beans, peas and okra.

While it is helpful to start early with many types of seeds, it is also important that you don’t plant the seeds too soon. In order to determine when to start sowing your seeds indoors, count backwards from the suggested planting time on the back of the seed packet. Most seeds will need to grow for approximately two to eight weeks before being transplanted into the garden. The suggested timeline will refer to your last frost date. If you are unsure of when this is, visit The Old Farmer’s Almanac: Canada or the The Old Farmer’s Almanac: United States.

All the supplies you need to start growing your seeds indoors can be found around the house or at a local hardware store or garden centre. For example, old food containers can be used to plant seeds in.  It is important, however, that any materials you are using or re-using are sterile. To sterilize seed trays use a weak bleach solution (approximately one part bleach to nine parts water). If you are using your own soil it is a good idea to spread it in a shallow pan and to set it in the oven (at 180 C, 350 F) for thirty minutes to be sure that it is sterilized as well.

How To Get Started:

Please note: Before getting started, it is important to read the back of the seed packet for any additional steps that may be required.

Step 1: Fill your starter tray (or re-useable food containers) with loosely packed soil. Using the spacing instruction on the back of the seed packet, poke holes in the soil for the seeds.

Step 2: Plant your seeds in the holes.

Step 3: Lightly water the newly planted seeds (be sure not to over water, as the seeds may float out of their planting holes). Once watered, cover the tray with a plastic lid (or, if you are re-using containers, place them inside zip-lock bags) to keep the moisture trapped. (At the first signs of germination, uncover the tray or remove the container from the plastic bag.)

Step 4: Over the first few days, check the tray to test moisture levels. Add water as needed.

Please Note: Water carefully. Use a small watering can to gently water the seedling only when the top of the soil appears to be dry. It is important that you do not over water as this can lead to the death of young plants.

Keep the tray in a relatively warm environment and provide at least eight hours of light daily. A bright window will work however, grow lights or fluorescent tubes are better, especially in dull winter climates. If you are using grow lights or fluorescent tubes, make sure to keep the seedlings approximately eight to ten centimeters (three to four inches) away from the light source.

It is important that you pick a good growing site for your seeds to germinate. The top of a fridge is a good spot, as the heat will help keep the soil warm and aid in germination.

Step 5: Transplant healthy sprouts to larger pots so they can develop a stronger root system. This will help make the transplanting process easier on them.

Once the outdoor gardening season arrives you will have strong, healthy sprouts to plant.

Good luck and have fun!

Image by Leaf by Leaf

Posted on

Not All Weeds Are Bad: Your Guide to Reaping the Benefits of Good Weeds in the Garden!

While most gardeners are quick to rid their garden of weeds, what many people don’t know is that some weeds can actually be beneficial to a garden! Therefore, rather than eliminating all of the weeds from your garden, learn to recognize those that will be helpful and use them to your advantage!

There are many different types of weeds that can provide numerous benefits to your garden. These benefits include the protection of topsoil, helping to pull up nutrients and water deep in the ground that other plants are unable to reach, luring harmful pests away from your crops and flowers and attracting beneficial insects to the area.

Protecting Topsoil:

Weeds such as spurges, purslane, lamb’s-quarters, chickweed and ragweed can be very helpful to have in a garden, as they will protect essential top soil from being washed or blown away.

Bringing Up Nutrients and Water:

Dandelions, prickly lettuce, spiny sow thistle, wild amaranths, cockleburs, nightshades and Queen Anne’s lace are examples of weeds that have very strong roots that go deep into the ground. Weeds with deep taproots can benefit a garden by breaking up hard soil and bring up nutrients from the areas that most plants are unable to reach. If the weeds are composted or turned into the soil, the nutrients that they have absorbed will be distributed for other plants to use. As well, moisture is also wicked upwards outside of the roots for other plants to benefit from. Weeds like Mugwort may also be helpful in absorbing heavy metals from the ground, stopping erosion and adding nutrients to soil.

Attracting Beneficial Insects and Luring Away Pests:

Certain repellent weeds such as dandelions, cockleburs and goldenrod can help to deter pests such as army worms. As well, other weeds including Lamb’s-quarters and Rosa multiflora will help protect your garden by luring away insects such as leaf miners and Japanese beetles that might otherwise feed on your plants.

Pennycress and dandelions are also great weeds for attracting beneficial insects. Clover is a common weed that can be used to attract earthworms and also to lure away pests such as rabbits. In addition, certain weeds such as Queen Anne’s lace, goldenrod, evening primrose, wild mustard, amaranth and dandelions will help to attract beneficial insects that will feed on and eliminate the harmful ones.

So, next time you go to weed your garden take a closer look and remember not all weeds are bad!

Image by davetoaster

Posted on

Indoor Composting: How to Build Your Own Indoor Composter

Looking for a way to compost your leftover organic materials but don’t have an outdoor area available? Make your own indoor composter! All you need are a few simple materials and you will be producing your own nutrient rich soil for your urban garden in no time!

All you’ll need is a trash can or other large container with a lid, a smaller container that will fit inside the trash can (this will hold your compost so make sure it is large enough) a brick or flat, medium sized rock and Stall DRY. The area under the sink in the kitchen is often a good place to keep your compost – just make sure that your larger container will fit easily into this area!

Place the brick (or rock) on the bottom of the larger trash can and spread some Stall DRY around it (this will be used to absorb any liquid that drains out of the compost bin). Next, make holes in the smaller container – place them on the sides and bottom of the container (a drill or a hammer and nail will work well for creating the holes!). Then place the small container inside the trash can. The brick will hold the smaller container up off of the bottom of the trash can so that any liquid can drain out into the absorbent Stall DRY underneath. The Stall DRY will absorb the liquid and help to absorb any odor!

You can speed up the composting process by making sure to mix up the materials in your compost often.

Keep in mind that composting is not an overnight process therefore it is often a good idea to build two composting bins so that one can be swapped out for the other while the composting is taking place.

Now you’re ready to compost!

Please note: Stall DRY can also be added directly to the compost to help keep down the odor and absorb any excess liquid (just be sure not to add too much Stall DRY, as you want the compost to keep a wet/dry balance).

Image by lindsay.dee.bunny

Posted on

Gardening: Easy to Grow Vegetables

There’s nothing like the taste and freshness of home grown vegetables, not to mention the fact that they contain much more nutrients than those that have traveled thousands of miles to reach your local grocery store! Many people are starting to grow their vegetables at home and why not – with these tips it’s easy! Even living in an apartment shouldn’t stop you from growing some of your own, fresh produce; all you need is a sunny window!

Carrots

Carrots are delicious, high in dietary fiber, antioxidants, manganese, niacin, potassium, vitamins A, B6 and C and are easy to grow at home! They will be ready to eat about two months after the seeds have germinated.

When planting carrot seeds, be sure to leave a few inches between the seeds and plant them less than an inch deep in the soil. Carrots can be easily planted outside or in a pot – as long as the pot is at least twelve inches deep. Keep the soil evenly moist in order to avoid growing carrots that are tough and stringy. Round carrot varieties will grow best indoors in pots.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes, which are in fact fruit, are highly nutritious, containing fiber, iron, magnesium, niacin, potassium, phosphorous, antioxidants and vitamins A, B6, C and E. Tomatoes will need at least three months before they are ready to be harvested.

When planting your seeds in a pot, plant only one tomato plant per pot. Depending on the type of tomato plant you are going to grow, you will need a pot that is anywhere from eight to eighteen inches deep. If you are planting the seeds outside in a garden, make sure to leave at least a foot between seeds to allow for growth. Mixing compost in with the soil will also be beneficial to your tomato plants! (See – Indoor Composting: How to Build Your Own Indoor Composter, for more information on do it yourself indoor composting.) If you are just starting out you may want to purchase a small tomato plant from a nursery, rather than try to grow it from seed, as this will be much easier!

Tomatoes require lots of sun so be sure to plant them in a sunny area or place your pot(s) in a sunny window! Make sure to water your tomato plant(s) a couple of times per week (a spray bottle will work well for this).

Peas

Peas can be grown indoors or out and will take a minimum of two to three months to grow. Peas are very nutritious vegetables, containing fiber, iron, magnesium, potassium and vitamins A, B6 and C.

Plant pea seeds approximately two inches apart and one inch deep and be sure that the plants have some type of support to climb up. If you are planting peas indoors, be sure that your pot is at least ten inches deep. If you are planting your peas outside in the garden it is best to grow them in the early spring or late summer/fall, as hot weather can interfere with their production. Mixing compost into the soil is also a good idea. Pea plants require more water as they begin to develop. Start by watering freshly planted seeds with approximately half an inch of water per week, increasing this amount to one inch of water per week once the plants begin to mature. Make sure that your soil drains well.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are very simple to grow, especially indoors! They can be grown indoors at any time of the year – all you need is a dark space such as a cupboard or attic.

The easiest way to grow mushrooms at home is to purchase prepared bags of special compost containing mushroom spawn. These bags will only need to be watered before being placed in a dark area. Be sure to maintain the temperature at approximately 50 to 60ºF (10 to 15ºC) and your mushrooms should be ready to harvest in just a few weeks!

To make your own mushroom spawn compost, pack a mixture of straw and an activator (you will need to purchase this) into a sterile plastic pot or bucket. Once the mixture has cooled down and begins to turn into compost, add the mushroom spawn. Place the container in a dark area and in a few weeks your mushrooms will be ready!

Lettuce

Lettuce is also a great indoor crop and a good source of folic acid and vitamin A!

In addition to grow lights or a sunny window, you will also need plastic containers (plastic boxes such as those that grocery store lettuce is packaged in will work great), potting soil and lettuce seeds.

To build your lettuce boxes simply slice eight or nine holes in the bottom of each box, add a couple of inches of moist potting soil and sprinkle a pinch of lettuce seeds over top. Cover the seeds with a small amount of soil. Using a spray bottle, generously spritz the surface with water. Put the lids on your boxes and place them in a bright, warm, sunny place or under your grow lights. The seeds should begin to sprout in approximately one week. Once the seeds have sprouted, remove the container’s lid to use as a watering tray. Fill the tray with water every day to keep the soil nice and moist.

Be sure that your lettuce plants receive enough sunlight! They will need approximately twelve hours of light per day therefore grow lights may be needed if ample sunlight is not available. Within three to four weeks you should be able to harvest your own, homegrown lettuce! To keep the plants growing, simply cut the leaves off and leave the growing crown intact. By doing so, you will be able to harvest more lettuce in about two weeks.

When growing lettuce outdoors, be sure to plant seeds in nutrient-rich soil that is free of debris. Plant seeds approximately eight to sixteen inches apart. Water the seeds every morning.

Please note: it is best to water lettuce only in the morning (and not at night) in order to avoid disease.

Nothing tastes better than fresh, homegrown produce! And with these simple tips growing your own crops at home is easy!

Image by quiltsalad

Posted on

Flood Recovery: Water Cleanup

In the aftermath of a flood, persistent indoor moisture can have negative implications for both personal and structural health.

The City of Calgary Water Services branch advises that failure to “…reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks such as respiratory disease”, while “mold may also damage building materials long after the flood”.

It is therefore important to treat any affected area using absorbent solutions in order to quickly capture and remove excess moisture.

Some simple and inexpensive solutions for use in the aftermath of a flood include Stall DRY Absorbent and Deodorizer and Can Dry Granular Absorbents.

With the ability to absorb up to 140% of their own weight in liquid, Stall DRY Absorbent and Deodorizer and Can Dry Granular Absorbents will remove unwanted moisture, dry out the treated area, prevent mildew and suppress odours leaving a cleaner fresher, and healthier environment.

These products are all natural and can be used on concrete and other sub-floor materials in flooded basements, rooms, sheds and garages after the excess standing water from a flood has been removed.

Directions for Use:

1. Remove all excess standing water with water vac, mop or other suitable device.

2. Once the standing water has been removed, apply up to 0.5 inches of Stall DRY Absorbent and Deodorizer or up to 1 inch of Can Dry on top of the sub-floor, concentrating on applying the product alongside the walls, including closeted areas, and extending out 6 inches. Where dry wall has been removed, apply the product alongside and in-between the studs.

3. Let product sit until dry. For best results leave in place until installing new dry wall and flooring.

4. Sweep up. If vacuuming, use a shop vac. Do not use a household vacuum for this purpose.

5. Dispose of used material. Please note: Stall DRY Absorbent and Deodorizer and Can Dry Granular Absorbents are all natural products and can safely be disposed of at landfill sites.

For use on concrete or sub-floor areas:

In order to dry the surface under wet carpet or damaged flooring, remove all carpeting or damaged flooring. Apply 0.5 inches of Stall DRY Absorbent and Deodorizer or 1 inch of Can Dry to the concrete or other sub-floor material surface. Let product sit until dry.

Clean up as instructed above.

If moisture and/or odour remains, re-apply the product and allow to sit for an additional 24 – 48 hours.

For use with cupboards:

Apply alongside the outside and inside of the base of cupboards. Cover the inside bottom surface with 0.5 inches of Stall DRY Absorbent and Deodorizer or 1 inch of Can Dry. Let product sit until dry. Clean-up as instructed above.

A 18.2 kg bag of Stall DRY will cover an area of up to 200 ft.2. A 16.3 kg bag of Can Dry will cover an area of up to 100 ft.2.

Please note: The area covered will vary depending on the dampness of the area being covered.

For more information about flood recovery, see the Alberta Health Services site at www.albertahealthservices.ca/2043.asp

Image by IntangibleArts